Case Study

Actigraphy For Multiple Sclerosis

ByJessie P Bakker MS Ph.D., Senior Manager Clinical Trials, Philips Respironics

Patient Centricity (002)

Why actigraphy?

Actigraphy is the measurement of motion used to monitor 24-hour activity patterns, usually performed with a small accelerometer contained in a watch-like device worn on the wrist or hip. The motion data timeseries can be analyzed to provide a range of validated endpoints relating to activity, sleep, and circadian rhythms.

The ability to measure motion precisely and continuously throughout a clinical trial, rather than at discrete study visits, allows for the application of advanced statistical techniques to model day-by-day (or night-by-night) changes between arms and over time, increasing statistical power. Actigraphy is non-invasive, meaning that the data reflect the experiences of the study participant undergoing their usual routine in their normal environment.

Activity patterns of those with multiple sclerosis (MS) fluctuate over time according to exacerbations and remissions, and therefore represent an important marker of disease progression. Read how actigraphy can be used to to measure conventional activity, sleep, and circadian endpoints and more to assist in studies.

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