Clinical Trial Technology Editorial

  1. How Can Disruptive Trial Models Help Us Meet Patients In The Real World?
    5/3/2018

    When it comes to drug development, the pharmaceutical industry has long followed the same model for how we approach clinical trials. However, we are on the precipice of a new opportunity for the entire healthcare system in which emerging technologies can help us develop and deliver medicines to patients in more agile and efficient ways than ever before.

  2. Harnessing The Hype: Can AI And Other Tech Make Patients Better Faster?
    3/22/2018

    Artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain technology, predictive analytics, cloud computing, and speech and image recognition are the latest buzzwords across industries. Numerous companies are looking to inject these technologies into their operations, and a great deal of funding is pouring into related startups.

  3. 3 Keys To Successful Blockchain Adoption In Clinical Research
    3/1/2018

    Excitement around the potential for blockchain platforms continues to build. This parallels the surge in popularity of blockchain-based cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. Meanwhile, “critics argue it’s all hype — a technological hammer looking for a nail — and that the complexities of health information prevent practical use of blockchain technology.”

  4. When It Comes To Study Start-Up, The News Is Still Bad
    2/21/2018

    The START II Study, conducted by Tufts CSDD and technology provider goBalto, attempted to determine how bad the study start-up process had become, and how pharma could address the growing problem. It now takes six to seven months on average to perform study start-up. Despite new technologies making the start-up process easier, we still have 11 percent of sites that are never activated.

  5. Will A New Engagement Tool Finally Solve The Patient Recruitment Problem?
    2/14/2018

    Getting new treatments to patients is a long and costly endeavor. Most drugs take upward of eight years and billions of dollars to receive regulatory approval. One of the biggest problems sponsor companies face when trying to launch a Phase 3 trial is finding enough patients to take part in the study.

  6. Focus On Change Management To Aid Technology Adoption
    2/12/2018

    Your employees will always resist technology change. Change tends to bring fear and uncertainty. To overcome fear and make your installation a success, focus on implementation, change management, and providing immediate benefits to users.

  7. Why Is It So Difficult To Implement New Technologies?
    2/8/2018

    For many companies, implementing new clinical technologies can be a difficult endeavor. Compatibility issues, training, and employees who are resistant to change can make implementations a challenge. What can executives can do to better prepare for change when it comes to their companies?

  8. Take A Page From Amazon’s Playbook To Transform Clinical Trials
    2/8/2018

    Since my first Amazon article, readers contacted me about Amazon-like transformations in clinical research. I never expected clinical research trends to emulate Amazon’s playbook.

  9. Decrypting The Utility Of Blockchain In Clinical Data Management
    1/16/2018

    According to a common refrain, blockchain will “transform” and “disrupt” the life sciences industry. While the technology’s applications in industries such as banking and broader financial services are readily apparent and, in fact, already being adopted, tangible applications in the life sciences prove more nebulous.

  10. Wearable Derived Data In Clinical Trials: The Biggest Barriers Are Crumbling
    12/14/2017

    Previous articles on Clinical Leader have discussed the potential benefits of wearable devices for remote patient monitoring in clinical trials. In addition to possible increases in trial efficiency and reduction of costs, “wearables” have the potential to collect data better reflecting patient functioning and response in the real-world setting.  According to the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative’s Mobile Clinical Trials (MCT) Program, mobile devices, including wearables, offer the opportunity to collect more complete and informative data than ever before. Mobile devices may also reduce the patient burden in clinical trials, thus enhancing the patient experience.  Companies are exploring the use of wearable devices in the post-marketing setting as well, as a component of patient care.